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And the politicians not to mention newspaper columnists conspire in this because having all the answers is what is supposed to distinguish us from

Posted on 27 August 2010

And the politicians, not to mention newspaper columnists, conspire in this because having all the answers is what is supposed to distinguish us from you mere readers or voters, and explain how we keep our jobs (rather than simply having photos of the editor in a Turkish bath-house).It occurs to me, though, that there are a couple of problems with having an ideology. Firstly, you can give instant and completely coherent answers to any question even if your ideology is completely wrong Indeed, it probably helps. David Icke, for example, believes that the world is secretly governed by giant lizards who disguise themselves as humans. If you put to him any query, on any subject, whether about politics or why there are so many sports quizzes on the BBC, he could immediately give you a giant lizard-related answer. His reply would be bonkers but it would be coherent, instant and consistent with his beliefs.Secondly, even if your ideology is seemingly more sensible, can it really cover all the complexities of society, all the inexplicable twists and turns of human behaviour? I doubt it. Isn’t it a more likely scenario, given that politicians feel compelled to act as if they are infallible, that they will respond to a situation by making their actions fit their ideology rather than the conditions of the situation itself?Changing your mind, doing a U-turn, is supposed to be the greatest crime a politician can commit, since it would call their whole infallibility shtick into doubt, and yet isn’t this a bit like a scientist sticking to their thesis even if their experiments give contrary results? (I know that some of them, especially those involved in vivisection and the arms industry, do this, but it is generally frowned upon.)Yes, I think it might be better to have as our rulers people like me who don’t have any certainty about anything at all.

Yeah, I’m pretty sure that I’m right about all this, or then, maybe not.. The United Kingdom in 2001 is a country where people are increasingly asking whether there is any point in voting. People sometimes say there are no great issues that divide the parties, and no great crisis confronting the country. My own view is that there has never been a more important time to vote. First, because it’s important that an increasingly out-of-touch Parliament becomes more representative and inclusive. Second, because there are serious issues which divide the parties, for example on the funding of public services, the environment and civil liberties.

The United Kingdom in 2001 is a country where people are increasingly asking whether there is any point in voting. People sometimes say there are no great issues that divide the parties, and no great crisis confronting the country. My own view is that there has never been a more important time to vote. First, because it’s important that an increasingly out-of-touch Parliament becomes more representative and inclusive.

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