Categorized | General

But the eradication of the deficit was left exclusively to Lee who put West London in front with six

Posted on 27 July 2010

But the eradication of the deficit was left exclusively to Lee, who put West London in front with six penalties and then converted a try by Malcolm Kemp that climaxed a length-of-the-field break-out after Rhodri Griffiths had scored Swansea’s third.The finale was as breathless and breathtaking as what had gone before. Addicott had a successful period as coach of Swansea Rugby Club and was also involved with Wales during the Ron Waldron years, but even in this latter role he never experienced such intensely personal disappointment as this.With the Universities’ Athletic Union having become the British Universities’ Sports Association with the widening of university status and a hugely increased number of participating institutions, the quality of this competition has sharply improved, and it showed in yesterday’s fantastic match.No longer is it a case of Loughborough versus the rest – though the Leicestershire university’s women did beat De Montford, Bedford, 53-11 in their final – but the very fact that West London had put Loughborough out in the semi- final reflected their high calibre. RUGBY UNION

BY STEVE BALE
West London Institute 31University College Swansea 30There were approximately 55,000 fewer people at Twickenham yesterday than were present last Saturday but they witnessed a spectacular universities’ final considerably worthier of a full house than the Anglo-Scottish contretemps that preceded it.You had to feel for Swansea, scorers of four tries (plus a couple disallowed) to West London’s one but booted to defeat by the unerring Andy Lee, the Saracens outside-half, who amassed 26 points and finally won the match with his seventh penalty from its very last kick.And in particular there is Stan Addicott, a figure of great respect in the Welsh game who has taken Swansea to Twickenham seven times in the 24 years he has been the university’s rugby coach and has seen his sides lose the lot. He enjoys the ambience of a club that likes a wager or two although when Torrance and Gallacher stood on the 16th tee yesterday afternoon nobody in their right mind would have bet against them.Scores, Sporting Digest, page 39.

A resident of Wentworth, he enjoys the courtesy of the courses here although, with the exception of the Sunningdale Foursomes, he is not allowed to invite guests. In 1971, aged 17, he was the assistant professional at Sunningdale. “We keep telling them but they won’t listen,” Ms Moon complained. “It was just too long for us.”The women have to play off the same tees as the men and on some holes they were struggling to reach the fairways.

Still, Helen Wadsworth and Sue Hodge were not complaining after reaching the last 16.For Torrance, whose driving and putting had set him apart here, it was an unexpectedly early demise. In the morning over the New Course the dream team enjoyed a painless victory in the second round, putting out the women professionals Cathy Panton-Lewis and Susan Moon six and five.Since Dale Reid and Corinne Dibnah won the title in crushing style in 1990, the fair sex have seen their handicap allowance cut. He and Goldie had received only one shot, at the 12th, which they badly squandered to go two down.Perhaps the name of Gallacher – he and Pat Garner were beaten in the final of the competition by Torrance and John O’Leary at the seventh extra hole 10 years ago – was not meant to be inscribed on the honours board In the draw sheet this week it has been spelt Gallagher. Torrance, just short of the green, left his chip about five feet below the hole and Gallacher’s putt for a four lipped out It was left to Walker to apply the coup de grce. “That’s one to tell the grandchildren about,” the 22-year-old Geordie professional said. All square.They went down the first again, Goldie played a magnificent chip to within about four feet of the flag. Goldie missed his putt for a four which left Gallacher with the responsibility of winning the match He missed The Scots had taken four putts from the shadow of the oak.

This post was written by:

admin - who has written 108 posts on Opiate For The Masses.


Contact the author

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Next Articles