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My mistake was I was too kind

Posted on 27 August 2010

“My mistake was I was too kind.” How’s that, again? “I should have shut the door on her.” Ah yes. If he has a fault it’s being too honest, too open, too kind.When she sued for £180 he spent £80,000 defending the case Unsuccessfully.”My constituents knew all about that They returned me with a higher majority.” The other thing Ummm. How do we put this? Pamella Bordes? His research assistant in the Commons? Experts now agree she may have been the only woman in England prettier than Liz Hurley A mouth like a mango Legs that have no comparison. “Someone persuaded me to take an immigrant on my staff,” Mr Shaw said That ought to dismiss the “bogus asylum-seeker” shibboleth “She was a volunteer. Never paid her a penny.”"And obviously, you didn’t know what she was up to?”"All I know is,” he said carefully, “you’d want to be very careful alleging anything about her That newspaper lost every court case about her My constituents knew all about that.

Returned me with a higher majority.” Let’s leave Pamella and get home.”To get back on the M25 to Oxford,” Mr Shaw said, “go right and follow that road 11 miles in the opposite direction to the way you think you want to go. It feels like the wrong way and, in some sense, it is, but it’s by the far the best way.” There’s a moral in there, for those that like that sort of thing. Or if not a moral, at least a message.simoncarr75 hotmail
More from Simon Carr. The row that suddenly erupted yesterday over the Tories’ tax plans ­ spookily reminiscent of the exotic confusion over secret agendas that used routinely to afflict Labour in the 1980s ­ puts into proper perspective much of the entrail-gazing that has attended the first week of Labour’s campaign.

For what it is worth, it also plays dramatically into the Government’s desire to portray the election as a choice between the mantras of public-service investment and the shrunken state. The revelation that a senior member of the Shadow Cabinet ­ reportedly the shadow Chief Secretary Oliver Letwin ­ envisages a total of £20bn in tax cuts comes at a time when the Tories could do with it least. Especially given that Labour’s private polling suggests that it is some 27 points ahead on tax. The row that suddenly erupted yesterday over the Tories’ tax plans ­ spookily reminiscent of the exotic confusion over secret agendas that used routinely to afflict Labour in the 1980s ­ puts into proper perspective much of the entrail-gazing that has attended the first week of Labour’s campaign. For what it is worth, it also plays dramatically into the Government’s desire to portray the election as a choice between the mantras of public-service investment and the shrunken state. The revelation that a senior member of the Shadow Cabinet ­ reportedly the shadow Chief Secretary Oliver Letwin ­ envisages a total of £20bn in tax cuts comes at a time when the Tories could do with it least.

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